2018
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Final-Report-PNB-Learning-and-Sharing-Meeting

Pay No Bribe / Resources Publications

The first Pay No Bribe (PNB) partners’ Learning and Sharing meeting was held at the Kenema Pastoral Centre on the 23rd and 24th October 2017.

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1. 1 PNB Learning and Sharing Meeting Kenema, August 2017

32. 32 CSOs Invite them to meetings through the exi sting coordination meetings Radio Joint advocacy/ sensitization activities MDAs/ other service providers Get them to do public endorsement of the PNB Sign integrity pact Unemployed youths Engage them at the lorry park, attire base, poyo bar, ghettos, trade fair, car wash, music, whatsapp, football games, cinema halls Hair dressers/ barbers Animators to engage them at their salons National celebrities – footballers, musicians, etc To endorse PNB

5. 5 In addition :  CSOs were asked to complete a short exercise on their animators, how many they were working with , Terms of Reference, how activities and animator reports were verifi ed, and how CSOs might modify animator arrangements in future (if at all).  The ACC were requested to prepare an analysis of PNB reporting data to date (i.e. an overview of report numbers together with breakdowns by sector and other variables. Th ey were also asked to prepare a summary of MDA response s .  Coffey agreed to prepare list of key emerging findings from the end - of - pilot survey, and to present these at the meeting .  Coffey visited each CSO individually prior to the meeting to update records and assess issues and problems.

13. 13 Day One, Session s Seven and Eight : Good Practice and Lessons Learned The p urp ose of Session Seven (mixed breakout groups) was to clarify and agree lessons learned around good practice to be taken forward . The purpose of Session Eight (reports from breakout groups) was to ensure a share d understanding across PNB partners and gain br oad buy - in to future strategies. T hese sessions largely served to reinforce findings from earlier sessions, paving the way for forward - looking discussions on Day Two. Gr oups were asked to identify the good practices and lessons learned, what they would more of and what they would do less of. Key points are captured in the box below. Text Box 1 : Good practices and lessons learned, doing more and doing less

16. 16 CSO Roles in MDA Engagement PNB partners then began to discuss CSO roles in improving MDA accountability but after a short time it was decided to finish the day’s business and resume in the morning. The following points were made:  Animators should have Service Charter information and messages for citizens but are not numerous enough to cover every health centre or school , therefore must be used strategically .  Alo ngside radio and other methods, b ike rider unions should be used to raise awareness on PNB : talk with the drivers who then talk to their passengers and pass on messages .  More relevant and more impactful IEC materials are need ed – CSOs can help with this. Day Two: Planning for the Future Day One, Session One: Recap Coffey produced a modified agenda for Day Two, to include discussion of the key points arising from the previous day. The d ay began with a verbal recap of what PNB Partners had discussed and r ecorded the previous day (see box below) .

24. 24 Annex Two : PNB Partners’ views of the Sharing and Learning Meeting PNB partners were asked to place different coloured stickers against the different elements of the meeting, from content to food, to indicate their overall satisfaction with the event. The table below indicates that all participants were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the meetin g itself and the outcomes , but there were mixed responses to the venue and the food. No What Happy /satisfied Somehow happy/satisfied Not happy/satisfied 1 Presentations/content 17 8 2 Group work and plenaries 12 7 3 General outcomes 10 7 4 Venue/accommodation 7 7 8 5 Food 5 8 11 TOTALS 51 37 19

33. 33 Annex Four: Coffey Performance through the PNB Pilot Phase PNB Partners were asked to write their opinions of Coffey management of the PNB on sticky notes and to pin them to papers at the back of the room. Over the two days of the meeting many views were expressed, which were grouped under themes and are presented in the table below. What Coffey has done well What did Coffey not do well What could Coffey do that is not doing now Choice of local CSOs Top down approaches to partners (no involvement in budget setting and late transfers) Increase logistic support to partner s Periodic sharing and learning meetings and information sharing Too many staff changes Regular training for partners Resourcing and technical inputs No ID cards for animators (already addressed) Q uarterly meetings with partners plus in volve partners in planning of implementation PNB start up and monitoring Faulty and insufficient equipment Remit funding promptly Few IEC materials ( NB. not a Coffey responsibility) Admin costs and support to admin limited No DSA to attend workshop

12. 12 by Christian Aid , with Restless Development managing th e Communications and Outreach component. CGG is also working on SABI and could lead in supporting closer working with PNB partners.  Action Point: As above, PNB CSOs would like to see Coffey organise opportunities for coordination and sharing, and would like to participate in joint M&E visits with ACC/Coffey ACC Presentations and Discussions The ACC highlighted again the importance of using the correct media to communicate with a broader range of target groups , and signalled its intention to revisit its work with radio to develop more effective programming. The ACC highlighted the usefulness of continuing with press briefings, which would increase citizens’ exposure to PNB messages. Learning and Action Points: ACC Discussions  Learning and Act ion Point: Use of Integrity and A ccountability N ow C ommittees (ANCs) in school engagement s has be en lacklustre and bribery persists in schools. Training is required to strengthen members of these groups to serve as peer educators.  Action Point: The ACC w ill f ocus on producing key messages as catchy jingles and using comedians and drama to convey messages in future communications and outreach activities A Theatre Performance After lunch, some CSO and ACC PNB partners produced a short drama to bring home PNB messages and to keep everybody was awake. The scene was a Government Office for Births and Deaths, and different characters in the drama portrayed their frustrations with trying to obtain the certifica tes to which they were entitled. A call was made to the PNB 515 hotline , resulting in vociferous arguments , but finally the ACC stepped in to help resolve the situation .

17. 17 Text Box 2 : Day One Themes and Messages Day Two, Session Two: CSO Roles with MDAs The discuss ion on the roles that CSOs can play and the support that they can give in strengthening MDA accountability continued from the previous day . This was discussed in plenary, with the following points being made: Action Points, CSO Roles  CSOs could consider forming ‘whistle - blower’ pressure groups to name and shame corrupt officials.  It could be advantageous to Involve MDAs in CSO/ACC activities at district and even national level. Integrating MDAs and Service Providers into PNB would help MDAs to share the aims and objectives of PNB  An entry point for CSOs could be to invite MDAs to coordination and accountabili ty feedback meetings with communities Common Themes and Messages Emerging from Day One PNB and reports PNB is up and running and over 30,000 reports generated Discrepancies in numbers reporting between districts Most reports coming from mobile app not direct calls. Need to focus on getting more 515 calls as app less sustainable than the phone Network coverage is vital to stimulating reports and calls Sustainability must be addressed as a key element of PNB Outre ach/Comms/PE Outreach needs to be broadened and deepened and have more targeted messaging so that more people know about PNB Radio is powerful but should be targeted to reach more groups (age, location, language). Need to know more about how to measure eff ectiveness of outreach activities Need to monitor accuracy of animator reporting Need greater clarity and consistency on criteria for recruiting animators Need to be strategic about deployment of animators Newspaper articles should be clearer and more in formative MDAs Not all MDAs have Service Charters, not all respond in a timely way and not all responses are long lasting (e.g. police road - blocks are removed and then return). MEST is a particular problem. Need to develop strategy to address these issues. There is a limited follow - up of MDA commitments either by MDAs (e.g. when they say they will ‘look into something’) or by ACC/CSOs on commitments made. Citizens want to know how corruption is being addressed and what has changed. There is a risk of the pu blic losing confidence in PNB (sustainability risk). Want to see perpetrators punished Some good collaboration going on already between organisations. Need more regular mechanisms. Need to develop a strategy integrating ACC and CSO approaches – what can A CC do more of using NACS powers with MDAs Training Appropriate targeted training needed by ACC and CSOs. Coffey Concerns regarding Coffey management especially re funding levels, quality of equipment, technical training and support to CSOs. This must impr ove

3. 3 Tables Table 1 Reporting Modes by age ................................ ................................ ............................... 6 Table 2 Citizen knowledge of Reporting bribes ................................ ................................ ......... 7 Table 3: Achievements ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 9 Table 4: Challenges ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 9 Table 5, Actions Taken by MDAs ................................ ................................ .............................. 14 Text Boxes Text Box 1: Good practices an d lessons learned, doing more and doing less ......................... 13 Text Box 2: Day One Themes and Messages ................................ ................................ ........... 17 Text Box 3: Group 1 Feedback on Growing Synergies ................................ ............................. 18 Text Box 4: Group 2 Feedback on Growing Syner gies ................................ ............................. 18 Text Box 5: Group 3 Feedback on Growing Synergies ................................ ............................. 19 Text Box 6: Thinking about Trade - Offs ................................ ................................ .................... 20 Text Box 7: ACC Feedback on Trade - offs ................................ ................................ ................. 20 Text Box 8: CSO Feedback on Trade - offs ................................ ................................ ................. 21 Text Box 9: Target Groups and how to reach them ................................ ................................ . 21

28. 28 audiences - More PNB radio programmes - Social media, cartoons, animations and short messages. - Hold community PNB sensitization meetings - Hold stakeholder meetings - Theatre groups sensitization - Empowerment of ANC and Integrity clubs - Community feedback meeting o n the PNB reports - Increase and timely funding to CSOs - Increase on the number of Animators (looking at the proportionality of the population and size of the community) - Provision of IEC to CSOs by Coffey - Replacement of faulty PNB phones - Provision of da ta bundles for animators - Development and installation of billboards - Provide PA systems to strengthen public sensitization Day 2 LOOKING FORWARD Session 1 Recap from Day 1 Session 2 CSO roles re MDAs CSO Roles Involving MDAs in CSO/ACC activities Strengthen dialogue between CSOs/MDAs/ACC Integrate MDA/Service Providers into PNB ACC to track MDA reports and MDAs to report to ACC when actions taken Invite MDAs to coordination and feedback meetings with accountability focus Involve citizens in holding MDAs to account Messaging language should avoid being overly legalistic CSOs could consider forming ‘whistle - blower’ pressure groups to name and shame corrupt officials CSOs to be included in agreeing the language for IEC materials Session 3 Growing the Synergies between Actors Group 1 What can ACC/CSOs do together to increase M DA responsiveness and accountability - ACC/CSOs/Coffey hold face to face meetings with MDAs to discuss responses and feedbacks on reports received - CSOs team up with ACC to specifically look at MDA responses monthly in order to establish responsiveness, ide ntify gaps and proffer recommendations for improvement - Set up a team to review existing MDA reporting template - Publicize actions taken on reports by MDAs that relate to specific district, age group, etc , also name MDAs that do not take actions on report s - Enforce deadlines for MDAs’ responses - State in press release if responses are not received on time Group 2 How have ACC and CSOs worked together on outreach activities - Public education through radio discussions, - Community sensitization, - Focused group discussions,

19. 19 Group 3 (see box below) focused more generally on what PNB partners felt hadn’t happened or hadn’t worked and w hat they want ed to see more of ? Like Group 2 (above) regular experience sharing meetings were highlighted Text Box 5 : Group 3 Feedback on Growing Synergies Day Two, Sessions Five and Six: Trade Offs The purpose of these sessions was to identify the most effective ways to address budget challenges and become more effective. The Coffey Interim Team Leader began the session with a short presentation (key points in the box below) which outlined the kinds of decisions that PNB partners could take to maxi mise public reporting and to achieve value for money. The Coffey ITL urged partners to consider how the ir different activities affect the impact of the PNB programme , and how greater impact might be obtained by redirecting investment from some types of a ctivities into others (see box 6 below) . She asked partners to think about tr ade - offs between, for example, using animators or using media, and whether to concentrate larger centres of population as opposed to more scattered rural locations and how greater synergies between partners could improve and deepen impact . Partners then divided into two groups, one ACC and one CSO, to discuss the issues raised and make recommendations . What didn’t work (or didn’t happen) and how to address What didn’t work or didn’t happen  TV programmes not successful  Limited theatre activities were carried out  There was no follow up of MDA reports or monitoring of MDA action points  There were no joint monitoring visits  No experience sharing between PNB partners regionally CSOs and ACC would like to do more:  Quarterly sharing and learning meetings between PNB partners  Radio discussions  Activities on ensuring MDA compliance  Provision of suitable IEC materials (wristbands, billboards etc.)

20. 20 Text Box 6 : Thinking about Trade - Offs Key points: ACC Feedback from the ACC focused principally on strengthening the targeting and energy of outreach and communications activities. Key points covered are in the box below. Text Box 7 : ACC Feedback on Trade - offs Key points: CSOs The CSOs also discussed the effectiveness of different types of media outreach, and in addition they raised issues of use and placing of animators. Feedback is reflected in the box below. Is Less More?  T he decisions about what to do more of and what to do less of will affect impact. E.g. considerations around outreach including radio/animator ratios. Should there be more or less radio? Media? More or fewer animators? More collaboration?  Hub and Spokes app roach to reach other districts nationwide through monthly joint outreach sessions to adjoining districts  Considerations around targeting – who to target? With what messages? Where? What type of radio or media programme is more effective, depending on the t arget group?  Animators: are on average 22/CSO. What are rural/urban ratios? Should animators be everywhere or should PNB focus on larger population centres and use targeted radio to reach small remote populations?  Bearing in mind the need to maximize repor t numbers should most animators in be district HQ towns and sent out on a monthly outreach using a hub and spokes approach? Or should some be located some in more populous chiefdom HQ towns?  How can CSOs and ACC best complement each other’s work? How can d istrict ACC and CSOs collaborate to maximize synergy?  In what ways can you reach small rural communities other than through animators? Is it the most efficient use of resources to use animators in sparsely populated chiefdoms? Is it possible to link with o thers that have broader reach? E.g. SABI  What strategies can be adopted to address the MDA challenge; to identify and share progress as well as highlighting instances of corruption  Other issues: stronger animator supervision needed; ID cards – template approved and to issue within 2 weeks  Use nationwide radio through e.g. IRN and engage IRN for national reach to achieve VfM and impact  Cut panel discussions and do other types of radio, such as jingles magazine programmes and soaps  Target youth through Music programmes, use of songs with PNB messages  Get publicity into news and current affairs programmes (free)  Focus on District Town Hall meetings, and less on chiefdoms  IEC - Bill boards at strategic locations – use Comic posters and cartoons  Film strips at community level  Use Public Service announcements

21. 21 Text Box 8 : CSO Feedback on Trade - offs Day Two, Session Seven: Who are our audiences and how do we reach them? The final session of the meeting focused on identifying target audiences and the different ways of reaching them with PNB messages. Text Box 9 : Target Groups and how to reach them Target group How to reach them Pregnant and lactating mothers , U5s Visit to PHUs/MCHs/DHMT Use big bold posters ACC/CSOs animators go to health centres to raise awareness Radio, town hall meetings, trade fairs School children Comic posters Kids and teen shows/programs Debate, Drama & Quizzes (DDQ) Sustained engagement Okada riders Stickers Engage/dialogue meetings with the union executives Road shows Pop music WhatsApp Animators to engage them at their parks Use riders as secondary messengers Drivers Lorry parks Same as okada riders University students Public lectures Strengthen accountability now clubs as peer educators WhatsA pp Facebook Embedded PNB sensitization into public functions/events – eg. during orientation Focus animator presence according to :  Size and population density in targeted communities/chiefdom  Presence of MDAs  Form adequate response to the justice sector (different types of courts) Community engagement  Reach a wider population, through outreach sessions, town hall meetings, religious houses,  Use theatres groups and local musicians in targeted chiefdoms/communities... To promote edutainment  Conduct radio and TV prog rammes at minimal cost  - Explore linkages with existing programs on radio stations at minimal cost  Engage radio station with national or regional coverage  Production and airing of jingles in other districts For PNB Learning Carry out quarterly feedback meetings on engagements

22. 22 Posters on campus Chiefdom structures – WDC, VDC, FMCs, etc Set up chiefdom network structures Animator should engage these structures in FGD, training Religious leaders Have dialogue with them to integrate PNB into their sermons, Friday prayers, their radio programs, Strengthen their endorsement and participation in PNB activities Develop appropriate PNB messages quoting Bible, Q’ran Market women/traders union Engage the union Use comedians in the market places Use Drama /Radio CSOs Invite them to meetings through the existing coordination meetings Radio Joint advocacy/ sensitization activities MDAs/ other service providers Get them to do public endorsement of the PNB Sign integrity pact Unemployed youths Engage them at the lorry park, attire base, poyo bar s , ghettos , trade fair s , car wash, music, WhatsA pp, football games, cinema halls Hair dressers/ barbers Animators to engage them at their salons General population Persuade national celebrities – footballers, musicians, etc. t o endorse PNB Conclusions of the Meeting Clear themes were identified by the PNB partners during the meeting and some clear agreements on what to address during the next PNB phase. Key areas of focus will be:  Development of varied approaches to increase MDAs responsiveness and accountability at district and national levels , including more story gathering of MDA successes to encourage MDAs and bolster public confidence.  Shi fting PNB reporting focus from app to 515 phone number for sustainability  Development of targeted and varied PNB campaigns to engage different groups of stakeholders and increase call numbers  Strengthening of communications and outreach activities building collaboration with radio , press and other media to engage different groups of citizens.  Possible resurrection of press briefings, including journalists who had PNB training, maybe monthly or quarterly  Strengthening o f collaboration and synergies includin g with non - PNB partners with similar aims and objectives.  I mplement ation of regular monitoring and verification visits CSOs to train on use of websites, check animators reporting, and involve random visits to communit ies .

31. 31  Discussions with MDAs and CSOs on service charters  Simplify service charters (CSOs + ACC)  Kono problem - stopping motor bikes, illegally held meetings with police to abolish illegal stops  Keep notes on payments of taxes on timber Session 6 Targeting Considerations around targeting Whom to target?  With what messages?  What type of radio/media to reach specific audiences  Animators – average of 22/CSOs  Consideration rural urban ratio  Should you be everywhere or focus on dens ely populated areas?  Approaches – try hub & spokes model to go nationwide  Synergy – How can CSOs & ACC best complement each others work  Reach – How can you reach  Small remote communities other than with animators with basic messaging  Is it most effective u se of resources to send animators to sparsely populated areas?  Is it possible to link with other organizations that have a broader reach? Eg. SABI?  Use radio for greater reach? Target group How to reach them Pregnant and lactating mothers Visit to PHUs/MCHs/DHMT Use big bold posters ACC/CSOs animators go to health centers to raise awareness Radio, town hall meetings, trade fairs School children Comic posters Kids and teen shows/programs Debate, Drama & Quize (DDQ) Sustained engagement Okada rider s Stickers Engage/dialogue meetings with the union executives Road shows Pop music WhatsApp Animators to engage them at their parks Drivers Same as okada riders University students Public lectures Strengthen accountability now clubs as peer educators Whatsapp Facebook Embedded PNB sensitization into public functions/events – eg. during orientation Chiefdom structures – WDC, VDC, FMCs, etc Set up chiefdom network structures Animator should engage these structures in FGD, training Religious leaders Hav e dialogue with them to integrate PNB into their sermons, Friday prayers, their radio programs, Strengthen their participation in PNB activities Market women/traders union Engage the union Use comedians Drama

18. 18  It is important to strengthen dialogue between CSOs, MDAs and ACC.  ACC should be tracking MDA reports and MDAs should be reporting to ACC when actions are taken.  Citizens can be involved in tracking MDA commitments and helping to hold MDAs to account  Messaging language should avoid be ing overly legalistic and should be easily comprehensible to citizens with varying levels of education.  CSOs should participate with ACC in agreeing the design and language for IEC material s Day 2, Session s Three and Four : Growing the Synergies Between Actors The purpose of this session was to identify and build stronger ways of working together within and between PNB partners. There were three mixed breakout groups , each on e tackling a different question, followed by a session where groups reported. Most of the issues raised built on earlier discussions . Group 1 (see box below) focused on MDAs and developing practical approaches to improve MDA accountability. Text Box 3 : Group 1 Feedback on Growing Synergies Group 2 (see box below) focused on outreach and communications and what more could be done. Discussions emphasised developing more proactive and tar geted activities and sharing experiences. Text Box 4 : Group 2 Feedback on Growing Synergies What can CSOs/ACC do together to increase MDA responsiveness and accountability? Key Points  Form a team (CSOs, ACC, Coffey) to review MDA responses monthly, identify gaps and develop recommendations for improvement,  In cases where an MDA consistently responds late or not at all, organise face to face meetings with MDA officials to discuss respon ses and feedback  Set up a team to review the existing MDA the reporting template.  Enforce the deadlines for MDA responses and name and shame those reporting late: state in press release if responses are not received on time.  Publicise actions taken on rep orts by MDAs that relate to specific district, age group, etc., also name MDAs that do not take actions In what ways have CSOs/ACC offices worked together on Communications/Outreach work and what new activities would you propose ? Jointly to date, ACC and CSOs have:  held joint outreach meetings and mass sensitization meetings on occasions  participated together in joint sector meetings and joint feedback meetings  carried out joint radio and TV programmes. Additional Proposed Activities  Hold quarterly public dialogue meetings together in PNB areas.  Hold PNB partner coordination meetings at district level on monthly basis for experience sharing and strengthening of impact  Work together on social media campaigns/information sharing initiat ives and set up a PNB WhatsApp group  ACC and CSOs should work together on joint development of IEC materials  Consider carrying out joint theatre group performances to publicise PNB messages and developing soap operas if funds allow.

29. 29 - Bi - monthly sectoral meetings, - Feedback sessions and sector meetings Additional Proposed Activities - quarterly public dialogue meetings in PNB areas - joint social media - joint IEC production - joint coordination meetings - joint quarterly experience sharing meetings - monthly CSOs coordination meetings Group 3 What it didn’t work and how to address - TV Programs, - Follow - up on MDAs responses and action, - Joint monitoring, - Learning /sharing experience sharing with ACC, Coffey, CSOs at regional level What could you do more of? - Quarterly regional learning and experience sharing engagement Radio discussion, - Enforce compliance by ACC - Adequate provision of IEC materials – wrist bands, bill boards - Community/focus group di scussions Session 4 – Lynda Kerley presentation on Trade Offs: Is Less More? In the context of modest resources there are important decisions on where and what to focus on, in order to maximize public reporting - The decisions you make about what to do more of and what to do less of will affect impact. E.g. considerations around outreach including radio/animator ratios. Should there be more or less radio? Media? More or less animators? More collaboration? - There are also considerations around targeting – who to target? With what messages? Where? What type of radio or media programme is more effective, depending on the target group? - Animators: are on average 22/CSO. Are considerations re rural/urban ratios. Do you try to be everywhere? Or focus on larger po pulation centres and use targeted radio to reach small remote populations. - Bearing in mind the need to maximize report numbers should you have majority of animators in district HQ towns and send them out on a monthly outreach using a hub and spokes approac h? Or do you locate some in the more populous chiefdom HQ towns? - How can CSOs and ACC best complement each other’s work? - In what ways can you reach small rural communities other than through animators? Is it the most efficient use of resources to use anima tors in sparsely populated chiefdoms? Is it possible to link with others that have broader reach? E.g. SABI - In what ways can ACC and CSOs at district level collaborate to maximize synergy? - Other issues: stronger animator supervision needed; need strategies to address the MDA challenge; ID cards – template approved and to issue within 2 weeks; DFID Hub and Spokes approach to reach other districts nationwide through monthly joint outreach sessions to adjoining districts. Session 5 - Addressing budget limit ations: What are the Trade - offs? Group 1 ACC Group 2 CSOs - Ensure nationwide reach through radio eg IRN - IRN has nationwide reach - VFM and impact - Reduce radio panel discussions to 2/month. Use saving to pay for other slots/programming in different districts - produce jingles, magazine programmes and - Increase on the number of animators based on - Size and population density in targeted communities/chiefdom - Presence of MDAs - To adequately response to the additional sector (Judiciary - local court, Kangaroo )

36. 36 15. 40 Session Eight and Lessons Learned Purpose : clarify and agree lessons learned and good practice to be taken forward and lessons learned? Mixed groups: all participants randomly assigned to 4 groups List all key discussion points 15.40 – 16.15 Session Nine Presentations of Good Practice and Lessons Learned Purpose : to share findings across participants, gain broad buy - in Each group to present 2 examples of each. 8 mins per group Flipchart: 2 x lesson learned; 2 x good practice 16.15 – 16.30 Tea 16.30 – 17.10 Session Ten Looking Forward: Implementation, what stays the same? Purpose : to focus on what has worked and why, and what teams will keep doing What sh ould CSOs and ACC continue to do/build on? 2 x randomly assigned CSO and 2 x ACC Teams 4 groups altogether Flipchart s : What we will continue doing 17.10 – 18.00 Session Eleven Building MDA engagement: the challenges and the solutions Purpose : to identify MDA issues and develop possible solutions Presentation by Edita on analysis of MDA responses and challenges. Plenary Discussion Facilitators to facilitate Flipcharts

23. 23 Annex One: PNB Learning and Sharing meeting, List of Participants Name Organisation Email EDITA FOFANA ACC editajusufu@yahoo.co.uk PATRICK SANDI ACC patsandi2007@yahoo.com SAHR NABIEU ACC nabieusahr@gmail.com ABUBAKARR KAMARA ACC yawanie09@yahoo.com JOSEPH HEZELY ACC josephhazely75@gmail.com ALIMAMY LAHAI KAMARA ACC lahaikamara@yahoo.com JOSEPH D S BLACKIE JR CARL pridesl2009@yahoo.com JEREMY B SIMBO CARL simbojer emy@yahoo.com SAHR KENDEMA CGG sahrkendema@yahoo.com VICTOR GRAFF CGG veeigraff247@gmail.com SHEKU JAMES NMJD shekujames@nmjdsl.org AUGUSTINE TARAWALI MADAM augustine - tarawali@madam - sl.org ESTHER KANU MADAM estokanu1989@gmail.com MELVINA COULSON CGG melvinacoulson@gmail.com ABDULAI SACCOH ACC saccoh2008@yahoo.com EMMANUEL.S. YAJO NMJD emmanuelyajo@yahoo.com JOSEPH .S. ANSUMANA NMJD josephansumana@nmjdsl.org EMMANUEL M ARUNA NMJD emmanuelaruna@nmjdsl.org JOSEPH S BANGURA MADAM jsphmjl@gmail.com KE LFALA KOI ACC SYLVANUS M BLAKE ACC blakesylvanus@yahoo.com SAM .P. GOGRA ACC gograsam@gmail.com MOI SELLU OBSERVER moisellu@yahoo.co.uk JOSEPH . H. BLACKIE CARL josephinehanblackie@gmail.com L YNDA KERLEY COFFEY l ynda.kerley @ coffeysierraleone.com DONAL MAGEEAN COFFEY donalmageean@coffeysierraleone.com HELEN APPLETON COFFEY CONSULTANT helenapple@me.com ANN KARGBO COFFEY CONSULTANT a kargbo2001 @yahoo.co.uk

8. 8  Of the citizens who had an opinion of PNB reporting mo des, most said that it was easier to use the 515 number that to report either through the app or through the website. A clear majority of citizens, however, did not have an opinion.  Opinions of FGD participants were divided in relation to whether corru pti on had increased or not over the previous year 2 . Interestingly, although most people (63%) reported that public officials are continuing to take bribes, a number also thought that officials’ behaviour may be becoming more discreet in relation to asking for bribes. Some people also argued that amounts asked for in bribes had reduced. Lessons and Action points : Coffey Presentation  Learning Point: There are still many citizens in pilot areas who have not come into contact with the PNB programme. Outreach must be broadened and deepened.  Learning Point : It is positive that citizens’ confidence in addressing corruption has grown, but FGDs highlighted the fact that any confidence could be quite fragile if people see little difference in their daily lives and/ or feedback to them about government actions is limited.  Action Point: Feedback to citizens on PNB and other government achievements must be strengthened.  Action Point : Citizens appear to find the 515 phone number easier to use than the app. This support s the sustainability point made above ( under the ACC presentation) about shifting animator focus from app to phone where network coverage conditions allow. Day One, Session s Two , Three and Four : Achievements and Challenges The p urpose of S ession Two (presentations of achievements and challenges) was for all PNB partners to share their experiences to help identification of lessons learned . The purpose of Session Three (breakout groups) was to build understanding of how organisations have built on ac hievements and responded to challenges to begin the id entif ication of lessons learned . The purpose of Session Four (report s from breakout groups) was to share thinking on achievements and challenges, share experiences and stimulate discussion on ways forward PNB Partners’ Achievements and Challenges All CSOs, Coffey and the ACC presented their analysis of achievements and challenges . Presentations were followed by discussions in mixed break - out groups and then reports back from all groups . The analysis in Table s 3 and 4 below reflects all achievements and challenges raised by PNB partners before and during the meeting. 2 Afrobarometer baseline, 2014/15 Round 6 survey

10. 10  Inconsistent q uality of animators and animator reports Other Key Points The ACC raised several issues in their presentati on:  Most MDAs have responded to reports, but there are gaps and delays that must continually be chased up  There is limited follow - up of MDA actions and no specific mechanisms for doing this.  MDA Service Charters are not all complete: citizens do not know w hat they should be paying for which services and when.  The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) has not responded to any reports and has no service charter. This apparent absence of accountability in one MDA is frustrating for all PNB partners.  Provision of electricity to the Call Centre has been challenging but it is hoped that this can be resolved using a solar unit  Not all PE/ communications efforts have been successful and PNB messages are not reaching al l audiences Feedback from Breakout groups and discussions Lessons and Action Points : Feedback  Learning point: Strong inter - agency collaboration between ACC national and regional offices and CSOs has been important to obtaining political buy - in more broad ly. It will be important to continue this .  Learning/Action Point: PNB PE materials and broadcasts are not reaching all audiences. Partners should develop more creative approaches to communications, perhaps using PNB songs and jingles and identifying people with outreach to ordinary citizens (such as religious leaders) or celebrities (such as footballers). Messages should be memorable and tailored to specific audiences or groups.  Learning /Action Point: MDA responses must be made more visible to strengthen accountability and build citizens’ confidence . PNB partners agreed to explore different tactics for engaging with MDAs at district levels, such as o btaining MDA endorsements for PNB objectives and messages from personnel such as the D istrict M edical O fficer (DMO) or the District Education Officer (DEO) , and customising engagement with Integrity Management Committees (IMCs) . Also impo rtant to gather stories and case studies highlighting instances where MDAs have taken action in response to reports and share these with the public, through the ACC platform as well as other media/social media routes.  Learning/Action Point: Addressing lack of MEST responsiveness is important. CSO s trategic engagements with MEST in Kenema and Bo ha ve been useful and productive, henc e PNB partners could work with MEST (and other) officials at district level to help to build momentum for change. This would support ACC actions at national level.  Learning/Action Point: Follow up on MDA actions is currently problematic and needs closer monitoring. CSO partners should work with ACC regionally and nationally to strengthen this element of the programme.  Acti on Point: The quality of a nimator activities and reporting should be improved. Animator selection criteria should be developed by Coffey with the CSOs, and each CSO should then review the animators it has and monitor their performance in future.

11. 11  Action P oint: As in the previous session, it was emphasised that animators should be encouraged to focus on enabling citizens to use the 515 number rather than the app.  Action Point: Service Charters should be turned into simple English when complete and distribut ed by all PNB partners through appropriate means . Partners could consider translating key points into local languages .  Action Point: Sustainability is critical and a sustainability plan should be developed and agreed as soon as possible.  Action Point: The holding of r egular sharing and coordination between all PNB partners should be set up as soon as possible.  Action Point: More collaboration with other agencies working on similar themes should be encouraged (for example SABI). Day One, Sessions Five and S ix : Outreach and Communications Sessions Five and Six were focused on exploring what had been achieved in the areas of communications, Public Education and Outreach. Three breakout groups were formed of CARL and MADAM; NMJD and CGG ; and the ACC to discuss what has worked and why . The purpose of Session Five (breakout groups) was to share experiences of what has worked and why, and to stimulate thinking around possible new outreach approaches, products and techniques The purpose of Session Six (reports from groups) was to stimulate ideas among PNB partners for strengthening effectiveness of outreach and communication activities and begin thinking about trade - offs between different activities to strengthen delivery . CSO Presentations and discussions 3 Some of the points made by both CSOs and ACC in their feedback reports had already been highlighted in the previous session , but it was useful to triangulate the information. The message s around investing in more effectively targeted communications and nee ding support to developing exciting and stimulating content came through strongly, along with the need for PNB partners to work closely together and improve information sharing. Learning and Action P oints : CSO Discussions  Learning Point: The hours of the Call Centre (9am - 5pm) restrict accessibility as many people call after 5pm when they have more free time. In addition, there are no Call Centre operators who speak Mende or Temne , which is difficult for Sierra Leoneans who are less comfortable using Krio.  Learning/Action Point: The quality of mobile phones , batteries and tablets is very variable, and poor quality equipment has hinder ed delivery of the programme in some areas . Coffey should ensure that all animators and CSO Coordinators have functioning equipment with reasonable battery life.  Learning/Action Point: Other organisations are working on themes like those covered b y PNB. Improved effectivenes s w ould be achieved by c ollaborati ng with these organisations, sharing messages and perhaps holding jo int community meetings where relevant . DFID have highlighted opportunities for sharing with SABI - Strengthening community - led accountability to improve service delivery in Sierra Leone – implemented 3 Notes from the all the breakout groups during the two days are in Annex Three

14. 14 Day One, Session Nine: Building MDA Engagement Given the seriousness of the challenges posed by the erratic quality of MDA responses to PNB reports, a session was organised to focus specifically on the issues and to d evelop strategies to address MDA shortc omings. Edita Jusufu Fofanu gave a present ation on MDA responses from October 2016 to July 26 th 2017. In summary, there have been 18 ‘General Actions Taken ’ 4 to date and 8 ‘Specific Actions’. 5 As noted above, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technol ogy has not yet responded to any of the ACC reports , and neither does it have a service charter . 6 Of the remaining MDAs, all except SALWACO have taken one or more ‘Specific Actions’. Table 5 , Actions Taken by MDAs 4 A ‘General Action’ does not commit the MDA to anything specific and is more difficult to monitor; e.g. “ DMOs will be requested to conduct preliminary investigations, take admi nistrative actions and communicate with the IMC at head office. ” 5 A ‘Specific Action’ denotes something that has been carried out and can be monitored, e.g. “ Rotation of Regional and Divisional Traffic commanders in Bo district. Similar actions are being taken in Bombali district. ” 6 MEST was the subject of 23 percent of all ‘I paid a bribe’ reports over the period October 16 to July 17 For good practices , PNB partners highlighted the following:  Developing prompt feedback mechanisms between ACC/MDAs/CSOs so that information can quickly be developed and used  Developing opportunities for regular experience sharing to maximise delivery.  Monitoring t he activities of animators and verifying their reports to ensure that findings are accurate.  Maintain activities of the Steering Committee to obtain broader government buy - in. Under lessons learned , PNB partners highlighted the following:  Strengthening mu lti - stakeholder engagement would increase public confidence to participate in PNB  Citizens want responses: activities with MDAs must be tightened up in order to demonstrate to citizens that there is change on the ground and to boost public confidence in PN B.  Updated service charters are critical to informing public on rights to free access as well as charges.  Public Education activities (ACC + CSOs) are critical: future plans must be robust, targeted and sustained.  Reaching people in their own language is more effective: need to increase the use of local languages for radio and other information.  Traditional and/or religious leaders can be strong and effective partners for PNB.  It is important to strengthen the appeal of PNB to young people - catch ‘em youn g! For ‘doing more’, partners said that they would:  Carry out more activities with radio, extending the reach to a broader range of groups  Develop social media, cartoons, animations and short messages.  Strengthen feedback to communities and the public more widely on PNB and MDA responses  Broaden the number of stakeholders with whom they work to include non - PNB partners.  Strengthen Integrity and Accountability Now Clubs where they exist to promote work with young people and in schools  Develop more IEC materials in conjunction with CSOs to help spread messages. For ‘doing less’ partners said that they would like to:  Make time spent on monitoring more effective though exploring the use of Kobo Toolbox to make animator reporting easier and more easily verifiable.  Explore reducing the number of monitoring reports required (monthly instead of weekly?)  Modify monitoring templates to ensure that information collected is clear and useful.

26. 26 well worked w ell differently Group 1 NMJD/ACC Community theatre groups - Its takes messages to the community and encourages ownership - Local languages used to reach people - Public entertainment - Mixed groups in urban areas engaged - opportunity for community interaction Using community meetings for MDA feedback - Few concrete results to report - Some results not sustainable - Collaborate with CSOs on SABI project. - Have key MDA stakeholders attend rural/urban community meetings to give feedback and an swer questions. - Gather community opinion on MDA responses. - Produce different radio, jingles and soap operas on PNB for different target groups - support urban theatre groups Urban and Rural community meetings - held in Local languages Group 2 ACC Joint outreach and media engagement Public recognition and acceptance TV Coverage No national spread, elitist - Appropriate media packaging for different audiences, Eg. Public screening on PNB, production of jingles in different languages Sectoral partnership Enhanced MDA response/ implementation of actions Jingles Limited language – Krio only - Use of comedians and drama groups Weekly press briefing Increased awareness by media houses (high coverage/public knowledge) Radio magazine Limited Int egrity clubs and ANC engagement Incidences of corruption and bribery continue in schools - Capacity building for integrity clubs and ANC to serve as peer educators on the PNB Group 3 CARL/MADAM - Increased community confidence in the - Removal of ungazetted checkpoints - Radio discussion and phone in programs - Hold Quarterly meetings with Coffey

7. 7  Action Point: ACC/Coffey should identify the reasons f or discrep ancies between numbers of reports from different districts .  Action Point: The programme is very dependent on animators helping citizens to make reports using the app ; c alls to 515 can be made independently and are less dependent on animator support. H ence a key area for PNB sustainability will be increasing the number of 515 calls.  Learning/ Action point: The PNB programme should identify the characteristics of different target audiences/sectors of the population (e.g. age, location, gender) in order to diversify its audience and ensure that effective means for disseminating messages are used (s ee also Session XX, Day Two) .  Learning Point: Linked to the above, there is currently a focus on panel discussion formats for PNB radio programmes: ot her types of formats would re ach a broader range of citizens; it will be useful to gather statistics on listeners and strengthen listener feedback mech a nisms . Coffey Presentation: End of Pilot Findings Also in Session One , Coffey presented a draft summary of the end - of - pilot survey taken from pilot districts only . The preliminary findings to date appear to demonstrate that citizens’ knowledge and awareness about PNB reporting have increased over the course of the pilot programme from 21% who can describe how to report a bribe in 2016 ( before the launch of PNB ) to 38.8% in July 2017 after 10 months of operation (see Table 2 below) . However, 61% of citizens have apparently not heard of PNB as they cannot describe one or more ways of reporting b ribes . Table 2 Citizen knowledge of Reporting bribes Other Key Points  Along with knowledge and awareness of PNB, citizens ’ confidence in being able to do something about corruption appears to have increased from 32.2% in 2015 to 49.5% in 2017. This indicates that an awareness of PNB in pilot districts has probably helped citizens to understand that they can play a more active role in combatting corruption.  Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) conducted as part of the survey indicate d that most citizens are confident that reporting bribery will make a difference. FGD p articipants also emphasised , however, that it is important for government to set an example and to be seen to be becoming more vigilant in relation to combating corruption . Those who had less confidence that they could do anything about bribery highlighted evidence of continued corruption and persistence of bribery as their reasons .

4. 4 Intro duction The first P ay N o B ribe (PNB) partners’ Learning and Sharing meeting was held at the Kenema Pa s t o r al Centre on the 23 rd and 24 th October 2017. Purpose and Outputs The p urpose of the meeting was to identify the lessons learned from the Pay No Bribe programme to date and to build on the findings to strategise around future delivery. The Outputs of the sharing meeting were envisaged as :  Good practices and lessons learned identified for inclusion into future strategies and work - plans.  Agreements on ways forward for CSOs and ACC staff to work together at district and national levels (improving synergies, sharing information, coordinated mo nitoring etc.)  Agreements on improving outreach strategies to maximise reporting: animation, PE materials and Communication strategies, case studies, blogs, social media posts, radio, theatre  Ideas for strengthening MDA involvement, accountability and res ponsiveness (to be taken forward separately with MDAs)  Ideas for improving effectiveness in the face of budget limitations Participants A total of 26 people participated in the 2 - day workshop. O fficials from the Anti Corruption Commission’s (ACC) national headquarters attended the meeting, with responsibilities for M inistries, D epartments and A gencie s (MDAs) and Public Education (PE). ACC P ublic Education officials f rom the Bo, Bombali and Kenema ACC regional offices also attended, along with representati ves from Kono, a district to be included in PNB from October onwards. The PNB coordinator and two animator representatives f rom each of the four PNB Civil Society Organisation partners were also present . These were : Campaign for Good Governance (CGG , responsible for Western Area Rural and Urban ); Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (CARL , responsible for Bo ); Mankind Activities Development Accreditation Movement ( MADAM , responsible for Bombali ) and the Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD , responsible for Kenema ) . Two NMJD representatives from Kono also attended. Coffey representatives comprised t he Interim Team Leader, the M&E Adviser and the Programme M anager, and the newly appointed CSO Coordinator. The two - day programme was fa cilitated by the M&E Adviser and Ann Kargbo from RADA in Bo. Prior to the Meeting Each organisation completed three core tasks prior to the meeting. These were:  An exercise to identify the main technical achievements that the organisation had identified, w hy it was felt to be an achievement , and what were the results and impact  An exercise to identify the principle challenges that the organisations had encountered, why they were challenges, what was done about them an d what impact they had.  A short presentation summarising the two main achievements a nd the most important challenge, to be given at the meeting

30. 30 soaps - Target youth in musical programs that include PNB music messages - The use of songs of PNB mes sages - Use news and current affairs programs that are no cost and have bid audience - Outreach engagement – focus on district town hall meetings, less on chiefdoms - IEC. Bill boards at strategic locations not static messaging. (comic posters  Film strips pl ayed at community level  Posters – more comic posters/cartoons  Public service announcements  Radio soap operas  Radio magazine programmes  Radio jingles - Community engagement - To reach wider population, through outreach sessions, town hall meetings, religious houses, - Use theatres gr oups and local musicians in targeted chiefdoms /communities... - To promote edutainment - Conduct radio and TV programmes at minimal cost - Explore linkages with existing programs on radio stations at minimal cost - Engage radio stations with national or regio nal reach - Do listener feedback meetings Production and airing of jingles General comments made by participants during plenary ACC Challenges  MDA service charters an respond to reports (MEST)  Follow - up to reports  Sustainability – ACC to take over – need clear plan for transition  Inaccurate reporting by CSOs plus poor phones  Animators quality has been weak in some cases – should strengthened  More training needed Others  Who is your target group?  How can you engage them?  Manage local/MDAs responses  Tail or messages  Take MDA discussions locally  PNB is about improving service delivery  Some IMCs working well, some less  IMC decisions not necessarily cascaded down to districts from Freetown  ACC does not control/ministry structure  ACC needs to change strategy o f engagement with IMCs  Monthly police presence at checkpoints - not clear who is taking bribes  MOH wants details of individual PHUs which PNB doesn’t not provide  EDSA wants to do away with anonymity  Put good news on the website  SABI (DFID - funded, Christian Aid implemented) working with local service providers to improve delivery  MDAs national and regional are key for PNB – SABI working more with local councils, etc  PNB is about empowering of communities  SABI based on trial and error – flexibility to see what works and what does not work

27. 27 PNB process - Feedback to the communities - In depth understanding and knowledge of PNB - Remuneration to animators (tight and delayed) - More support to rad io/phone in programs for CSOs - Increased/strong coordination among CSOs, stakeholders, MDAs, etc - Cordial relationship with the ACC, CSOs, MDAs and communities - PA system to aid large community sensitization - Collaboration with more partners – eg Christian Aid, Restless, etc - Willingness of citizens to report - Number reports compiled by the ACC/portal - Poor network coverage/mobile and internet - Replacement of mobile phones - Stakeholders engagement - Weak animators - Reporting portal to operate a fter 5pm - Regular monitoring – CSO’s, Coffey, ACC - Lack/ adequate IEC materials - Employ staff with more languages at call centre - Meetings with Coffey/other IPs - Radio discussion and phone in programs Session 8 – What are Good Practices? What are Lessons Learnt. What could we do more of? What should we do less of? Group 1 What are Good practices - Partnership among stakeholders in the campaign - Public education (Robust) - Press briefing (Regular) - Drama /skits (comedians) - Capacity building for integrity clubs and ANC to serve as peer educators - Prompt feedback - Mechanism between MDAs, ACC/CSOs and the public - Experience sharing sessions among stakeholders (ACC, CSOS and Coffey) to be regular - Monitoring of animator activit y re reporting accuracy equipment use, etc. - Steering committee activities maintained and made regular Group 2 Lessons - Multi - stakeholder engagement leads to increased public confidence and participation in the PNB - Joint work needed on a comprehensive com munication plan for robust and sustained public education work - CSO capacity to be improved for more effective delivery - Citizens want responses. MDAs responses must be tightened up in order to demonstrate to citizens that there is change on the ground and to boost public confidence in PNB. - Updated service charters critical to informing public on rights to free access as well as charges. - Using local languages, local structures and traditional and religious leaders to enhance credibility of messages - Ens ure young people are targeted Group 3 Do More Of - monthly submission of animator report sheets by Kobo Connect. Reduce time spent by animators on daily/weekly reporting and time on Coord consolidation. - More TV spots on PNB targeting specific Group 4 Do Less Of - Less sensitization on PNB phone application and more direct 515 calls - Reduce multiple questions asked by call centre - daily/weekly form filling by animators

34. 34 Annex Five: 3 ACC and CSO Sharing and Lesson Learning Meeting Agenda The Outputs of the meeting will be:  G ood practice and l essons learned identified and incorporated into future strategies and work - plans.  Agreements on ways forward for CSOs and ACC staff to work together at district and national levels (i mprov ing synergies , sharing information, coordinated monitoring etc.)  Agreements on improving outreach strategies to maximise reporting: animation, PE materials and Communic ation strategies, c ase stud ies, blogs, social media posts, radio, theatre  Ideas for strengthening MDA involvement, accountability and responsiveness (to be taken forward separately with MDAs)  Ideas for improving effectiveness in the face of budget limitati ons Meeting Agenda Day 1 – Reflecting Back Time Session + Purpose Format Outputs Comment s 8.30 – 8.45 Introduction Purpose : Get to know each other Introductory exercise: stand up; walk around; introduce oneself to people you don’t know. 8.45 – 9.15 Session One O verview Purpose : to present background, emerging survey findings and big picture questions Welcome by ACC and Coffey. ACC presents PNB data analysis. Coffey coordinator to introduce briefly, Facilitator presents end - of - pilot survey and any k ey questions. Plenary Flipcharts noting any key issues and questions raised 9:15 – 10.00 Session Two Presentation : Achievements and Challenges to date Purpose : to share achievements and challenges among participants to feed into lessons learned Pre - prepared presentation s of 2 things that have gone well (achievements) and 1 challenge (all technical) by CSO s, ACC, Coffey. Facilitated Discussion Plenary PPT files: Lists of achievements and challenges for each CSO , ACC and Coffey. Flipcharts of key discussion points 10.00 – 1 0.5 0 Session Three Exploration of Achievements and Challenges Purpose : to build understanding of how organisations have built on achievements and responded challenges: begin Plenary Q&A (10min s) Followed by group work: What facilitated achievements, how were challenges addressed? Ideas? What can we learn? 4 groups mixed by geography, CSO, Coffey and ACC offices. Notes of discussion key points on f lip - charts: Each group to identify reasons for achievements, how built on and

15. 15 MDA Number of ‘I Paid a Bribe’ reports % of ‘I Paid a Bribe’ reports Number of Specific Actions Taken Number of General Actions Taken Sierra Leone Police 9604 42% 4 4 Health, Sanitation 5263 23% 2 3 MEST 5238 23% 0 0 EDSA 1098 5% 1 5 SALWACO Guma Valley 434 2% 0 1 3 3 TOTALS 21,636 95% 8 18 NB. Only ‘I Paid a Bribe’ reports have been included. Percentages do not equal 100% due to reports against ‘other’ sectors Other Key Points from the presentation  There is an urgent n eed to develop a strategy to engage with MDAs at national and district levels . Engaging with MDAs at district levels could help encourage the national offices to be more responsive.  IMCs, who have the responsibility in theory to address issues of bribery and corruption in MDAs, are not fully con stituted and/or active at district level s. Their functioning is often constrained by funding limitations . This is a major challenge that the ACC needs to address .  National IMC decisions are not cascaded down to regions and the mechanisms that could facil itate this are largely missing . EDSA , is more joined up , however, and could possibly be used as an example to other MDAs.  Making IMCs more functional at regional levels is a priority that predates the setting up of the PNB programme. This will require a focus on MDA management taking IMCs seriously and offer ing them committed leadership and support . Learning and Action Points: MDA Presentation  Action Point: As noted previously, there are opportunities at district levels to engage with local DMOs and DEOs etc . to enhance the responsiveness of different ministries. A strategy sh ould be developed for CSOs and ACC to build pressure to strengthen accountability at district level. N aming and shaming of less responsive ministries could be considered .  Action Point: G ood success stories should be collected by all as part of daily activities and sent to the ACC in Freetown to put on the website as well as being communicated by other means such a social media . 7  The ACC has powers under the National Anti - Corruption Strategy ( NACS ) to ensure compliance. It could consider using these powers more proactively to bring pressure on more recalcitrant MDAs  Once produced, Service Charters should be simplified and key points translated into local languages and publicised through radio, jingles, messages etc., with which b oth CSOs and ACC can engage . 7 Two useful examples were highlighted during the meeting, one with a school in Bo and one with t he Health authorities i n Kenema

6. 6 Day One : Learning and Reflection The ai m of the day ’s activities was to enable constructive reflect ion on what has happ ened in PNB to date to prepare the ground for looking forward and developing strategi es on Day Two. Day One, Session One : The Background 1 The p urpose of this session was to present background information and emerging survey findings to enable constructive question ing of future strategies . Two presentations were provided, one an analysis of reporting data and the other a summary of the preliminary findings of the end - of - pilot survey. ACC presentation of PNB Reporting Data In Session One, the ACC presented their analysis of PNB reporting data from September 2016 to the end of July 2017. During this period, nearly 30 ,000 reports were received through the PNB Call Centre, reporting app o r website. For seven out of the nine months, between 2,000 and 3,000 reports were re gistered . Other Key points  Reporting was higher from Kenema and Bombali, than from Bo and W estern A reas rural and urban .  The clear majority of all report s were made through apps (81% in 2016 and 87% in 2017 ) . The numbers of people calling the call centre free 515 number was lower at around 12 % in both years .  By age group, m ode s of reporting varied mainly between those in the 15 - 19 age group and the rest of the popula tion as per the table below. Table 1 Reporting Modes by age Mode 15 - 19 30 - 49 Over 50 Call Centre 16% 9% 10% Mobile Apps 83% 89% 86% W ebsite 1% 2% 4%  In relation to s ectors , Police received the largest number of ‘I Paid a ‘Bribe’ reports at 42% of all complaints. Police reports were esp ecially high from Kenema , followed by W estern A rea Urban , Bombali , W estern Ar ea rural and Bo. Numbers of Health and Education reports were similar across the districts .  Almost all b ribes a re paid in cash, with other s ervices, products, animals or food and sexual favours being less used. W orryingly , the highest numbers of sexual favours were re ported for the Education sector. Lessons and Action points : ACC Presentation  Learning/Action Point: CSOs found the summary of reporting data was very helpful and asked that something similar be shared with them on a monthly or quarterly basis to strengthen feedback to citizens. 1 All presentations given at the workshop will be circulated to all participants

25. 25 Annex Three : Copies of Flipcharts from all discussions Day 1 REFLECTING BACK Session 3 Achievements and Challenges – Underpinning Factors Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Factors underpinning achievements - MDAs responses not visible to the public - Weak monitoring on the part of oversight institutions - Inadequate logistical support to enhance PNB implementation Inadequate technical support – e.g, training to CSOs, MDAs, exchange learning visits, etc. - Insufficient awareness raising in communities through radio programs How easily adapted co uld they be for different environments? All the above cuts across Which responses to challenges do you think you can use/adapt? - Mandate MDAs to make their responses visible - Build the capacity of oversight institutions - Provide adequate logistical suppor t to CSOs - Provide technical support to CSOs and MDAs - Increase on robust community and radio programs Key learnings for you? Issues raised are common Factors underpinning achievements - Political buy in/willingness of MDAs - Increased public participation resulting in more reports through he APPs/website/calls - Inter - agency collaboration/CSOs intervention How easily adapted could they be for different environments? - Flexibility of the PNB - More community engagements, - Participation of stakeholders - More public education and sensitization - Customized engagements with the MDAs - Active media involvement - Media alliance against corruption Which responses to challenges do you think you can use/adapt? MEST ( MEST Non - compliance) - Strategic engagement betw een ACC and DD MEST Kenema - Leadership style and willingness - Capacity of animators – recruitment and deployment Key learnings for you ? - Learning points - Sustainability aspects of PNB - MEST commitment needed Factors underpinning achievements - Increased p ublic awareness – Robust public education, team work, funding How easily adapted could they be for different environments? - Public education can be adopted/adapted in every environment - Different kinds of public education messages for different/specific a udiences - Customized engagements/tailored messages Which responses to challenges do you think you can use/adapt? - MDA responsiveness - High public expectation of change - Animator quality and accurate reporting - Service charters Key learnings for you from t he presentations? - Commitment from the top to enable certain MDAs compliance – eg. MEST - Not everybody hears the same messages, tailor the messages for specific audiences Factors underpinning achievements - More animators in class A chiefdoms - Radio programs - Community outreaches - Stakeholders’ engagement - the school outreach - Network coverage - Anonymity Session 5 – Outreach: Communications/Public Education/Animation. Good practice and Lessons Learnt What has worked Why? What hasn’t Why? What we do

2. 2 Table of Contents Tables ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 3 Text Boxes ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 3 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 4 Purpose and Outp uts ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 4 Participants ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 4 Prior to the Meeting ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 4 Day One: Learning and Reflection ................................ ................................ ............................. 6 Day One, Session One: The Background ................................ ................................ .................... 6 ACC presentation of PNB Reporting Data ................................ ................................ ...................... 6 Lessons and Action points: ACC Presentation ................................ ................................ ................ 6 Coffey Presentation: End of Pilot Findings ................................ ................................ ..................... 7 Lessons and Action points: Coffey Presentation ................................ ................................ ............. 8 Day One, Sessions Two, Three and Four: Achievements and Challenges ................................ ..... 8 PNB Partners’ Achievements and Challenges ................................ ................................ ................ 8 Feedback from Breakout groups and discussions ................................ ................................ .... 10 Lessons and Action Points: Feedback ................................ ................................ ........................... 10 Day One, Sessions Five and Six: Outreach and Communications ................................ .............. 11 CSO Presentations and discussions ................................ ................................ .............................. 11 ACC Presentations and Discussions ................................ ................................ ......................... 12 Learning and Action Points: ACC Discussions ................................ ................................ ............... 12 A Theatre Performance ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 12 Day One, Sessions Seven and Eight: Good Practice and Lessons Learned ................................ .. 13 Day One, Session Nine: Building MDA Engagement ................................ ................................ . 14 Learning and Action Points: MDA Presentation ................................ ................................ ........... 15 CSO Roles in MDA Engagement ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 16 Day Two: Planning for the Future ................................ ................................ ........................... 16 Day One, Session One: Recap ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 16 Day Two, Session Two: CSO Roles with MDAs ................................ ................................ ......... 17 Action Points, CSO Roles ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 17 Day 2, Sessions Three and Four: Growing the Synergies Between Actors ................................ . 18 Day Two, Sessions Five and Six: Trade Offs ................................ ................................ ............. 1 9 Day Two, Session Seven: Who are our audience s and how do we reach them? ........................ 21 Conclusions of the Meeting ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 22 Annex One: PNB Learning and Sharing meeting, List of Participants ................................ 23 Annex Two: PNB Partners’ views of the Sharing and Learning Meeting ............................ 24 Annex Three: Copies o f Flipcharts from all discussions ................................ ................... 25 Annex Four: Coffey Performance through the PNB Pilot Phase ................................ ........ 33 Annex Five: Workshop Agenda and Programme......................................................................33

35. 35 to identify lessons learned how challenges addressed. 10 . 50 – 11. 10 Coffee 11.10 – 11. 5 0 Session Four Presentation of discussions Purpose : to share thinking, share experiences, stimulate discussion on ways forward Each group to p resent 3 - 4 Key Points on fac tors underpinning achi evements, addressing challenges. Plenary: 8 mins each group with quick questions and clarification at the end Flipcharts 1 – 2 per group: summary of factors underpinning achievements and challenges 11.5 0 – 12. 35 Session Five The Role of Outreach: Comm s/ PE /anim ation : Good Practice and Lessons Learned Purpose : to share experiences of what works and stimulate thinking around possible new approaches, products and technique s Discuss ion on how teams have approached Comms, PE and animation to date? 1 CSO team (CGG + NMJD; on Comms/PE/social media/IEC 1 CSO team CARL + MADAM?) on animation, theatre 2 mixed groups of ACC and Coffey Comms/PE/social media/IEC (can discuss animation and theatre if relevant) 4 groups altogether Discussion n otes on Flipchart: 1 per group , 4 in total Note emerging issues on flipcharts 12.35 – 13.1 0 Session Six Presentation of Outreach and Comms/PE achievements Purpose : to share findings across participants, stimulate ideas for strengthening effectiveness of outreach and Comms and begin thinking about trade - offs Presentation of two key achievement s, 8 mins each group Plenary. Allow comments, no discussion Flipchart: 8 - 10 key Comms/PE achievements (allow overlap) 13.1 0 – 14.00 Lunch 14.00 – 14.15 Energiser Theatre/drama developed by workshop participants Short skit/drama on PNB 14.15 – 14.55 Session Seven Summar ies: starting to bring it all together. Purpos e : to begin processes of agreeing emerging findings and strategising around ways forward Facilitators to present common themes/lessons from morning. Facilitated discussion. Plenary Q&A , Discussion Plenary, presentation, in powerpoint. Flipchart notes 14.55 – 15.00 Energiser: keeping lively 15.00 – Goo d Practice Break out groups on good practices Flipchart:

9. 9 Table 3 : Achievements ACHIEVEMENTS CARL MADAM NMJD CGG ACC Coffey Totals PNB up and running despite challenges 1 1 1 1 1 5 Changes in behaviour of service officials /reductions in unofficial charges 1 1 1 1 4 Large numbers of people reached/made aware/trained 1 1 1 1 4 Building of relationships with other PNB partners or other organisations 1 1 2 Removal of unofficial checkpoints 1 1 Close monitoring of service delivery 1 1 Table 4 : Challenges CHALLENGES CARL MADAM NMJD CGG ACC Coffey Totals Lack of responsiveness from MDAs 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 Poor quality smartphones and equipment 1 1 1 1 1 5 Quality/reporting issues with animators 1 1 1 3 Call Centre languages 1 1 1 3 Unwillingness of citizens to report/ nervousness about reprisals 1 1 1 3 Making the PNB sustainable 1 1 1 3 Lack of Service Charters from MDAs 1 1 2 Monitoring of MDA responses 1 1 2 Collusion/culture of silence between citizens and MDA officials 1 1 2 Officials (e.g. Police) still extorting money and/or threats of reprisals by public officials 1 1 2 Network connectivity 1 1 2 Transport problems for Animators 1 1 Challenges with price hikes/exchange fluctuations/ other budget problems 1 1 Key points The principal achievements highlighted by most PNB partners were  T he fact that the PNB is up and running;  T he large number of reports received (exceeding the logframe target); and  C hanges noted in the behaviour of some public officials  Key challenges highlighted by PNB partners were:  The poor timeliness and content of MDA responses  The low quality of smartphones and other equipment

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