2020

ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSION OF SIERRA LEONE

An independent institution established for the prevention, investigation, prosecution and punishment of corruption, corrupt practices and to provide for other related matters. 

Contact us on: +23278832131 or info@anticorruption.gov.sl
Address: Cathedral House, 3 Gloucester Street, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 2019 NATIONAL CORRUPTION PERCEPTION SURVEY REPORT: ACTIONS, HOPES AND IMPEDIMENTS IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CORRUPTION IN SIERRA LEONE

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

vThe Report is commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (CARL) with funding from Department for International Development (DFID) and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network (BAN).

vThe Studies examines perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, from April 2018 to December 2019 (focusing on the administration of President Julius Maada Bio and Francis Ben Kaifala Esq., as Head of the Anti-Corruption Commission-Sierra Leone), and their (citizens) own roles and actions in relation to the fight.

METHODOLOGY:    

v3 major information streams fed into the work: desk review, a national survey and key informant interviews.

vThe Study was conducted between September and November, 2019.

v2,619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts in the Country.

KEY FINDINGS:

vAbout 73% of respondents said corruption is still a serious problem in Sierra Leone.

v46% of people said Government’s fight against corruption 3 years ago was at least good. It rises to 51% that Government’s efforts is very good in the last 12 months.

v91% of persons have heard about the ACC-positive, showing enormous public education and public relations work across board.

v69% believe that prosecution is the most effective way for ACC to fight corruption.

v91.3% of respondents hold the view that ACC have been and is creating the greatest impact in the fight against corruption. This was followed by the Police 51.3%, the Judiciary 51.2% and the Media 40.8%.

vBribery-There is improvement 71% of people said it was common to pay a bribe 3 years ago, but fell to 56% who said it was common to pay a bribe in the last 12 months.

v90% of respondents acknowledged that paying a bribe is a wrong thing.

vPoverty ranked as the major cause of corruption by 70%, followed by greed 69%, lack of integrity 59% and low salaries (54%).

vThe most corrupt institution is the Police. Followed by the public health centres, public schools, Parliament, local government, public universities and judiciary. Noteworthy, interactions and visibility may be fuelling these perceptions.

vThe perception of the presence of sacred cows has decreased from 57% 3 years ago to 47.7% over the last one year-very positive. By 9.3%

 

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE REPORT:

Decrease points where cash exchanges hands.

Target institutions that ordinary people interact with most, especially service delivery entities.

Utilize religious leaders to campaign and pass messages relating to corruption.

To draw out credible links between corruption, poverty and conspicuous consumption elites.

Strengthen relationships with and build capacity of Parliamentary Public Accounts Committee.

Look into corruption in certain key private sector operations, including real estate, transport and communication.